My Trip To Cuba with Professor Cecilia Rodriguez Milanes 1/13/2012

Cecilia Rodriguez Milanes

Cecilia Rodriguez Milanes is a professor of Latino/a literature and writing at the University of Central Florida in Orlando.  Professor Rodriguez Milanes recently visited Cuba, an Island that offers 5 star world class resorts, hires foreign Chefs from Canada, France and Italy to ensure that the meals will delight the almost 2 million yearly visitors, magnificent beaches, dancing, music, and historic views while their citizens live under strenuous laws that subordinate freedom of speech, freedom of the press. Cuba where government maintains complete control over all forms of mass media, including newspapers, radio and television, an Island where criticism of national leaders can lead to imprisonment and even death. There has always been a mystery surrounding this Caribbean Island and Cecilia will tell us stories as only she can about family, education , living conditions, food prices, access to electricity, water, gas, architecture, changes, progress, Etc.

If you have always wondered about Cuba and would like to know more about  the Island from someone who has been there recently or if you are curious about the present Cuba, this is the show for you. Open Mic the last half hour, call with your questions.

Cecilia’s is a accomplished writer as well, her short fiction has been anthologized in Iguana Dreams: New Latino Fiction. Did My Mama Like to Dance? and Other Stories about Mothers and Daughters, and in New World: Young Latino Writers. Her short story collection, Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles which was released in June 2009 and Everyday Chica among others.

PORTRAITS OF EL MALECON 12/3/2011

Sheldon Schiffer

Co Host: Monica Rosales, Executive Director of DOCMIAMI.

Filmmaker Sheldon Schiffer, befriends several Havaneros whose relationship with the wall provides meaning and mental subsistence in very different ways. With a 16mm Arriflex camera of a nostalgic vintage, Schiffer invites his subjects to compose a portrait of their most meaningful view on the Malecon – one that symbolizes their station in life, both personally and politically. Each of his subjects, a poet-intellectual, a musician, two prostitutes, an aging historian, and three young students with time on their hands, each connect their personal ambitions and attitudes toward Cuba as they collaborate with the filmmaker to create a cinematic ‘portrait’ of the seawall, and ultimately one of themselves.

TRIBUTE TO OUR MILITARY 11/11/2011

Honor of our military

In honor of our military: Aaron Kennefick his mother tells us what kind of a man he was and how he continues to influence her life even after his death.

In honor of Kenneth Westbrook his widow tells us how much Kenneth loved his country and how she deals with the loss of  her husband.

WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR SGT AARON M KENEFICK’S AMBUSH? 6/14/2011

WHO IS RESPONSIBLE

COLD CASES: MOTHER SEEKS ANSWERS. Heroism in ambush may yield top valor awards
By Dan Lamothe –  Staff writer for Marine Corps Times

With no air or artillery support, the Marines of Embedded Training Team 2-8 were trapped deep in a kill zone in eastern Afghanistan. Their radios worked only sporadically, and dozens of insurgents fired on them repeatedly from three sides.“We’re surrounded!” Gunnery Sgt. Edwin Johnson yelled into his radio in the early-morning hours of Sept. 8, 2009. “They’re moving in on us!”

At least twice, a two-man team attempted to rescue their buddies, using an armored vehicle mounted with a .50-caliber machine gun to fight their way toward them. They were forced back each time by a hail of bullets, rocket-propelled grenades and mortars. An enemy bullet hit the vehicle’s gun turret, piercing then-Cpl. Dakota Meyer’s elbow with shrapnel. He shook it off, refusing to tell the staff sergeant with him because he didn’t want to make the situation worse, according to U.S. Army documents outlining a military investigation of the ambush. What he did next will live on in Marine Corps lore — and, some say, should earn him consideration for the Medal of Honor.

After helicopter pilots called on to respond said fighting was too fierce for them to land, Meyer, then 21, charged into the kill zone on foot to find his friends. Under heavy fire, he reached a trench where the pilots had spotted the Marines, by then considered missing. He found Johnson, 31; Staff Sgt. Aaron Kenefick, 30; 1st Lt. Michael Johnson, 25; Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class James Layton, 22; and an Afghan soldier they were training — all dead and bloody from gunshot wounds. They were spread out in the ditch, their weapons and radios stolen.

Additional information:

Heroism in ambush may yield top valor awards

Report: Army denied aid to team under fire

Comments from grunts in the infamous Ganjgal ambush

… Multiple requests for air [support] were made and it kept getting pushed back. We were told multiple times through an hour that air will be there in [redacted] min. Fire missions were repeatedly called up by ground troops and ourselves and many were denied… Repeatedly assets were requested for support but no asset urgency was shown.”